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Calling all sober job seekers!

Calling all sober job seekers!

Join us Saturday, September 16th @ Serenity Lane West 11th Intensive Outpatient Office, 4211 West 11th, Eugene for a Serenity Lane Alumni resume building and job seeker skills workshop. 9:00am-Noon

To Register call Layne Frambes 541-733-6698 or Email: lframbes@serenitylane.org 

The workshop will be led by Heather McBride whose business, Inclarity 360 helps job seekers with everything from resume writing to interview techniques.

  • Fee is $10.00 per person.
  • We have 20 spaces for this class available so sign up ahead of time to reserve your place!
  • SL will provide breakfast rolls& coffee
  • Family Members are welcome but need to pay the class fee

The class will cover the following:
1. Principles of resume writing
2. Reviewing a model template
3. Worksheets in group breakouts with Heather.
4. Dos and Don’ts.
5. Q&A regarding alumni concerns – job gaps, job hopping,
tapping into skills, etc.
6. 1:1 reviewing their current resume and feedback or group review

1st Annual Disc Golf Tournament Soars to Success

1st Annual Disc Golf Tournament Soars to Success

The first annual Serenity Lane Soaring for Sobriety disc golf tournament was a blast!

We had so much fun!  37 professional and amateur disc golfers turned out plus a small army of volunteers.  Pictures coming but meantime: some stores from the day and shout outs to those who made it happen.

One couple actually flew down from Seattle just to play in the tournament.  Another player, a person who went through Serenity Lane’s Intensive Outpatient program in Portland won 1st place in his division.  And when he received his trophy, he began weeping with tears of joy; stating he has been playing disc golf for over ten years and never won a game.  He has now been sober for 14 months and he won his first trophy.

The pros walked away with some really nice cash prizes. and one of the amateurs won four tickets to this year’s Bi-Mart Country Music Festival.  Another lucky raffle winner (a volunteer) took away a brand new kayak!  There were many other great prizes, thanks to our sponsors.

A very big thank you to our title sponsor, Willamette Family Treatment Services. We thank you for your support, your time and for helping make this event truly special. From the great remarks from executive director Susie Dey to the 10 volunteers who came out the day of the event to help ensure everything ran smoothly.

And to our additional sponsors: Sponsors, Inc., Chambers Construction, Bi-Mart and Play it Again Sports: thank you. Your support enabled us to bring together alumni, disc golf pros, friends and family on a beautiful, sunny day to celebrate recovery, eat tasty food and go home with some fabulous prizes!

Thank you!

(stay tuned for pictures!)

 

Mine!

Mine!

From the series: Tidbits About Addiction and Recovery by Serenity Lane’s director of outpatient services, Nate Mart MBA, NCAC II, CADC III

I was on vacation last week and had the opportunity to spend time with my kids. It was fun, exhausting, and needless to say, I’m glad to be home. Spending more time meant I was able to witness more behaviors than usual. My daughter, who is two, kept saying things were “mine.” Everytime my son, who is four, had something in his hand, she would say “mine.” I noticed it before going on vacation but noticed it even more on this trip.

I often share about addicts and alcoholics having an intense relationship with their drug of choice. A bond so strong it takes the place of actual relationships. I find it interesting the struggle addicts have in letting go of their substances. Don’t get me wrong, I fully understand it, but still, it’s an interesting phenomenon. Why would a person return to something which has been so destructive? Why would they, even after having the knowledge of recovery, return to use?

When they enter treatment and continue to have struggles, in a way they’re telling everyone their addiction is “mine,” and they alone can deal with it. Similar to what my daughter does, she insists if we just give it to her, everything will be fine. Those chemicals, no matter if we understand it or not, provide them comfort and peace. It may not be the peace you and I think of, but it’s their peace and who’s to tell them their feelings are wrong?

I talk about the powerful bond of addiction with high school students all the time. Spouses of addicts often describe this relationship similarly to having an affair. Addicts and alcoholics bond with substances for years, sometimes decades, and it’s this bond that makes it difficult to give up. Over the course of their lives, at some point, they discovered these substances worked for them. It provided them with things they couldn’t get in their natural environment. If an addict’s irrational thoughts are telling them this substance is “helping,” you can understand why it’s so difficult to give up. Again, even if we don’t get it, it’s very real for them.

My daughter doesn’t need most of the things she says are hers, just as the addict doesn’t need substances. However, at that moment, my daughter thoroughly believes it’s hers just as the user thoroughly believes drugs and alcohol are crucial for survival. And I don’t mean life or death survival, although that is the case in some instances, I mean just getting through the day, just being able to work, or function normally. The struggle comes in helping the addict realize they can survive without it, which is the same struggle I have with my daughter.

Who would’ve imagined the behavior of kids would line up so well with the behavior of addicts?

Recovery Reads

Recovery Reads

We have been down this road before. In the mid-1800s the U.S. as in the grip of an opioid epidemic with striking parallels to our current situation today. With roots in traditional folk medicine, opium was a prevalent and well-known cure for a variety of ailments. Doctors seeking to distinguish their credentials and services promoted opium-derived products like morphine and delivery innovations like the hypodermic syringe.

In Inventing the Addict, Zieger tells the story of how the addict, a person uniquely torn between disease and desire, emerged from a variety of earlier figures such as drunkards, opium-eating scholars, vicious slave masters, dissipated New Women, and queer doctors. Drawing on a broad range of literary and cultural material, including canonical novels such as Uncle Tom’s Cabin, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula, she traces the evolution of the concept of addiction through a series of recurrent metaphors: exile, self-enslavement, disease, and vampirism. She shows how addiction took on multiple meanings beyond its common association with intoxication or specific habit-forming substances—it was an abiding desire akin to both sexual attraction and commodity fetishism, a disease that strangely failed to meet the requirements of pathology, and the citizen’s ironic refusal to fulfill the promise of freedom.

 

Roseburg adds new yoga, relaxation and meditation classes in April

Roseburg adds new yoga, relaxation and meditation classes in April

Starting April 20th, Serenity Lane’s Roseburg campus will feature two yoga classes per month on the first and third week of each month.

The first class will be on Thursday, the 20th at 5 pm followed by May 5th at 11:30 am.

The rotation of classes will be:

First Friday of the month at 11:30 am
Third Thursdays at 5 pm

An instructor will also be presenting once every four months during family programming. For more information call (541) 673-3504

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Sober St. Patty’s Day

Sober St. Patty’s Day

photo credit the awkward yeti

First it is important to note that St. Patrick’s day is a time to honor the roots of Irish religious beliefs, feast with loved ones and honor the memory of a guy who was neither a canonized saint nor really named Patrick. The whole green beer, kegs and eggs, kiss me I’m Irish thing came later.

For those in recovery, this may provide some inspiration when navigating the more modern iterations of the holiday: day drinking and overdrinking.

Here are three things you can do today that have nothing to do with green beer, bars or being a drunken hooligan.

  1. Bake some Irish soda bread! 
  2. Whip up some corned beef! 
  3. Read up on the holiday!

 

Whatever you do – remember that this is just another day! You can still eat and be merry but if you find yourself feeling antsy call a friend, get to a meeting, or keep busy by trying your hand at a new recipe.